Sunday, July 15, 2007

Me and Paul in New Harmony

"We can speak without voice to the trees and the clouds and the waves of the sea. Without words they respond through the rustling of leaves and the moving of clouds and the murmuring of the sea."
-Paul Tillich

And here’s what came back:

You scored as Paul Tillich, Paul Tillich sought to express Christian truth in an existentialist way. Our primary problem is alienation from the ground of our being, so that our life is meaningless. Great for psychotherapy, but no longer very influential.

I scored 80% consistent with Tillich, followed by these theologians in descending order:

Jurgen Moltmann, 73%;
Anselm, 67%;
Augustine, 67%;
John Calvin, 60%;
Friedrich Schleiermacher, 47%;
Martin Luther, 33%;
Karl Barth, 27%;
Charles Finney, 20%;
And Jonathan Edwards, 13%


I really don't know much about Paul Tillich. But I know that at one time, Paul Tillich lived in a little town, one of my favorite places, New Harmony, Indiana - near the Wabash River. For two centuries, it has been a mecca for scientists, educators, artists and writers.

I happened upon New Harmony one September after a long day of driving, to find a German Street Festival shutting down. It seemed like a quiet village and a great place for walking. New Harmony was the site of two of America's great utopian communities and continues to be a place full of surprises -

a roofless church:

...located inside the walled garden. In the center of the Roofless Church is a 50 foot dome made of laminated pine arches. Under the dome is a Bronze, the altar piece, designed by Jacques Lipchitz. Translated the Bronze reads, "Jacob Lipchitz, Jew, faithful to the faith of his ancestors has created this virgin for the good will of all mankind that the spirit might prevail."
Stroll around near the Roofless Church, and you might find Paul Tillich Park, where excerpts from his writings are inscribed on the stones of the garden:
"Man and nature belong together in their created glory - in their tragedy and in their salvation."






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