Thursday, April 8, 2010

Views of Saturn




More to be said later on the Galileoscope. https://www.galileoscope.org/gs/

A truly noble concept.



So far, I have examined craters on the surface of our moon via the GS. I read that the scope permits a view of Saturn's rings (of course, nothing like the detail of these satellite images).



For more than the ones posted, here's a slideshow of the exquisite Cassini Saturn pics:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5344141/ns/technology_and_science-picture_stories/displaymode/1107/s/2/

And a link for more JPL images of Saturn from the Cassini Mission:
href="http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/index.cfm%22%3Ehttp://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/index.cfm


It would be easy to spend a few hours at this NASA website of astronomical photos:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap041225.html




It is marvelous indeed to watch on television the rings of Saturn close; and to speculate on what we may yet find at galaxy's edge. But in the process, we have lost the human element; not to mention the high hope of those quaint days when flight would create ''one world.'' Instead of one world, we have ''star wars,'' and a future in which dumb dented human toys will drift mindlessly about the cosmos long after our small planet's dead. -Gore Vidal



Jet Propulsion Lab image of Enceladus, a moon of Saturn
.



SATURN'S RINGS
-by Barbara Lefcowitz

the round walls of old cities
bracelets of flamenco dancers
cambium layers fingerprint-whorls

no metaphor can elucidate
why so many rings within rings

ice, rocks, and dust
some braided, some a pale red
knotted thin elliptical

but this much I know
from my earthly, my only
perspective:

the saturnine need
such labyrinths of light

to see the contours of their darkness
especially its edges and rims

lest they forget that as children of winter
they have a flair for the slanted
shapes of light, door-cracks, thin stripes

the facets of diamonds
to be plucked from the snow

if they dare break
the circumference of sadness




Another Lefcowitz poem, RINGS, BAGELS, SATURN, opens:

Wandering from its orbit, perhaps drunk or merely bored, one of Saturn’s moons shed its icy skin, which gravity’s dark matter then spun into a ring. The moon’s dense core, filled with cosmic debris, kept wandering, perhaps to intrude some time later into another planet’s orbital path....

The entire poem is at:
http://www.barbaralefcowitzpoetry.com/?p=869

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